Policy & Politics announces the 2022 winners of the Early Career and Best Paper Prizes

Prize P&POscar Berglund, Claire Dunlop, Chris Weible.

2022 prize narratives.
We are delighted to announce the 2022 prizes for award winning papers published in Policy & Politics in 2021.

The Bleddyn Davies Prize, whichacknowledges scholarship of the very highest standard by an early career academic, is awarded to From policy entrepreneurs to policy entrepreneurship: actors and actions in public policy innovation by early career scholar Maria Galanti and her co-author Giliberto Capano.

The Ken Young Prize, which is awarded to the best article judged to represent excellence in the field published in Policy & Politics, is awarded  to Beyond nudge: advancing the state-of-the-art of behavioural public policy and administration by Benjamin Ewert, Kathrin Loer and Eva Thomann from the special issue Beyond nudge: advancing the state-of-the-art of behavioural public policy and administration.

Brief critiques of the winning articles follow, in celebration of their contributions.

From policy entrepreneurs to policy entrepreneurship: actors and actions in public policy innovation by early career scholar Maria Galanti and her co-author Giliberto Capano.

In this outstanding paper, the winner of the prize for the best paper published in 2021 by an early career researcher, Maria Galanti along with her co-author Giliberto Capano argue that, although policy entrepreneurs are considered key actors in public policy, there are so many varied definitions of what they do that it is difficult to use the concept in a systematic, analytical way. Following a critique of the concept of policy entrepreneurs, the authors reframe the concept as a pattern of action (involving different types of actors) focused on innovation promotion via problem framing, solution development, coalition building, and seeking opportunities and attention.

With its scientific analysis and clear, concise conclusions that debunk the misconceptions surrounding the term policy entrepreneurship, this article makes a welcome contribution to the literature, and is a worthy winner of our Bleddyn Davies prize. Congratulations Maria and thank you Giliberto for your support of this exceptional work!

Beyond nudge: advancing the state-of-the-art of behavioural public policy and administration by Benjamin Ewert, Kathrin Loer and Eva Thomann.

In their award winning article, the winners of the prize for the best paper published in 2021, Benjamin Ewert, Kathrin Loer and Eva Thomann advance our current understanding of Behavioural Public Policy by moving beyond “nudge”, the iconic but contested synonym for any policies that have been inspired by insights from the behavioural sciences so far. Based on a broad conceptual design and methodological pluralism, they suggest that behavioural policymaking must develop a more nuanced understanding of the interrelations between social structures and individual action in order to effectively tackle more complex policy problems.

The behavioural model they posit helps us to understand the varieties of influences and interactions on behaviourally informed policies and paves the way for integrating them into policy mixes that include conventional instruments in order to also address structural aspects of policy problems.

In this way, their broader conceptual design for behavioural insights presages a more intelligent and adaptive policy design that is better equipped to respond to severe policy challenges. This clear contribution to the field makes their paper stand out as being the worthy winner of our annual best paper prize. Congratulations Benjamin, Kathrin and Eva!

Read the winning articles here:

From policy entrepreneurs to policy entrepreneurship: actors and actions in public policy innovation
Giliberto Capano and Maria Tullia Galanti

Beyond nudge: advancing the state-of-the-art of behavioural public policy and administration
Benjamin Ewert, Kathrin Loer and Eva Thomann

The views and opinions expressed on this blog site are solely those of the original blog post authors and other contributors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of Policy & Politics, the Policy Press and/or any/all contributors to this site.

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